The airbrush

My big gift this birthday/Christmas season was this airbrush package from Amazon.com. For $99 it’s hard to beat. Three airbrushes and an automatic air compressor. So far I’ve only used the two gravity-feed airbrushes, I haven’t even used the siphon airbrush.

The first project I tackled with the airbrush is this set of cut stone walls and a couple accessories and doors:

Cut stone modules

I had put them together a few months ago now, but had not painted them. I had even used them in a couple of game sessions unpainted. So lazy. Anyway, they are painted now, so Yay for the Airbrush!

Now, I learned a valuable lesson from painting them. Airbrushes create a huge mess if you aren’t using them in the middle of the Sahara Desert or something like that. With temperatures hovering in the range of techincally freezing to freeze-your-damn-ass-off freezing, I’ve decided not to try to paint outdoors. So after a couple days of painting and learning how to use (and how not to use) my airbrushes, and creating a massive mess in my craft/gaming room, I decided to make a hood to keep the paint from spraying all over kingdom come. (It’s actually not that bad for the type of airbrushing I do, but I did make more of a mess than I wanted.) After looking online for some options, I made this hood out of cheap dollar store foam core posterboard and some hot glue.

Airbrush_hood

The only problem now is that the hood is sorta bulky and I don’t have any place to put it. So I may just use it as a GM screen. 🙂

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